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A Fair Bear Share
Author: Stuart J. Murphy
Illustrator: John Speirs
Publisher: HarperTrophy
Copyright: 1998
ISBN: 0-06-446714-7
Number of Pages: 40
Ohio Standards Alignment: Grades 1–2

Mama Bear sends her cubs to gather the ingredients for a pie.  She tells them that if they get enough, they will each get their fair bear share of the pie.  As the cubs return from each gathering trip, Mama bear helps them count the contents of each basket and add to get the total.  Drawings show collections of up to 100 objects grouped by tens to reinforce place-value ideas for students in grades 1-2.  In addition to the mathematical ideas, the story also shows what happens when one member of a group does not do his/her fair share.

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How to Use This Book
Highlights and Insights
Related ORC Resources
Ohio Standards

 


How to Use This Book

  • This book could be used as an introduction to place value or as a review of place value prior to regrouping in subtraction.
  • The story could also encourage students to cooperate when they are engaged in group work.
  • Students will enjoy drawing their own place-value pictures of 2-digit collections of berries, seeds, or nuts.

Highlights and Insights

  • Place value and regrouping are essential topics in addition and subtraction. This book presents these concepts in a meaningful and engaging way that will interest nearly every youngster.
  • The illustrations in this book are adorable, and they actually teach the mathematics. The students must be able to see the illustrations in order to get the full effect of the lesson.
  • Ideas for extension activities are described at the end of the book.
  • Other books on similar concepts are also suggested.

Related ORC Resources

Block Pounds
View Full RecordAdd to My ORC Collection
ORC# 1127
Resource Information
Resource Type: Lessons
Discipline: Mathematics
Grades: Grades K–2
Professional Commentary: Students figure out the weights of objects using information presented in pictures. They also model situations that involve the addition and subtraction of whole numbers, using objects, pictures, and symbols....
Make a Hundred
View Full RecordAdd to My ORC Collection
ORC# 5793
Resource Information
Resource Type: Lessons
Discipline: Mathematics
Grades: Grades 1–3
Professional Commentary: Students roll a die seven times, each time determining whether to add the number shown to the tens column or the ones column so that the total after seven rolls will make a sum as close to 100 as possible without going over. Guiding questions, summary questions, assessment tasks, extensions of the lesson, a recording sheet,...
Description and Lesson Plan for the Base 10 Blocks Program
View Full RecordAdd to My ORC Collection
ORC# 3618
Resource Information
Resource Type: Content Supports
Discipline: Mathematics
Grades: Grades 1–2
Professional Commentary: This website provides an applet and complete instructions for using base ten blocks to teach the four operations of arithmetic from a place value perspective. The advantage of using the applet over real base ten blocks is that the applet blocks can be glued into larger units to illustrate addition and broken into their component units...

Ohio Standards

Number, Number Sense and Operations Standard
    Benchmarks (K-2)
    M. Add and subtract two-digit numbers with and without regrouping.
    A. Use place value concepts to represent whole numbers using numerals, words and physical models.
    Grade Level Indicators (1)
    5. Use place value concepts to represent whole numbers using numerals, words, expanded notation and physical models with ones and tens. For example: a. Develop a system to group and count by twos, fives and tens. b. Identify patterns and groupings in a 100's chart and relate to place value concepts. c. Recognize the first digit of a two-digit number as the most important to indicate size of a number and the nearness to 10 or 100.
    Grade Level Indicators (2)
    1. Use place value concepts to represent, compare and order whole numbers using physical models, numerals and words, with ones, tens and hundreds. For example: a. Recognize 10 can mean "10 ones" or a single entity (1 ten) through physical models and trading games. b. Read and write 3-digit numerals (e.g., 243 as two hundred forty three, 24 tens and 3 ones, or 2 hundreds and 43 ones, etc.) and construct models to represent each.