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Pigs Will Be Pigs: Fun With Math and Money
Author: Amy Axelrod
Illustrator: Sharon McGinley-Nally
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Copyright: 1994
ISBN: 0-02-765415-X
Number of Pages: 36
Ohio Standards Alignment: Grades 3–5

The members of the Pig family are hungry, but there is no food in the refrigerator. Mr. Pig suggests they go out to eat, but they need money to pay for their meal. They search all over the house finding bills and coins of varying denominations. Their search yields enough money for them to go to their favorite restaurant. How much money do they have left when they leave the restaurant?

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How to Use This Book
Highlights and Insights
Related ORC Resources
Ohio Standards

 


How to Use This Book

  • Students can be actively engaged in the story line by finding the value of each collection of bills and coins. Have student volunteers record the value of each collection on chart paper and keep a running total as the story is read orally. Provide time for students to discuss, explain, and reach agreement on each amount found and the running total.
  • Have students find different snacks the Pig family could buy with their "found" money. The menu in the book provides a variety of options. Individual students or small groups can take on the role of customer and share an "order." Other students or small groups can take on the role of restaurant worker by providing a "bill." The customers can then pay the bill with play money, and the restaurant workers can return their change. Students should also use appropriate decimal notation to represent the cost of items ordered, the total cost, the amount of money used to pay the bill, and the change received.
  • Have students use a menu from a local restaurant to estimate the cost of various combinations of food items. Have students give their orders and challenge other students to quickly estimate the cost of each order. Ask students to explain how they made their estimates.
  • Depending on students' needs, the teacher may wish to change what coins are found. "What if they had found a quarter, two dimes, and three nickels instead?"
  • Students might write their own "Pigs Will Be Pigs" story using coin and bill combinations suitable to their grade level.
  • This book is a good read-aloud book!

Highlights and Insights

  • The story line provides opportunities for students to count collections of coins and bills as well as keep a running total of the money found. 
  • The restaurant menu provides a context around which students can build their understanding and skill in adding and subtracting money amounts and making change.
  • Money situations provide a context for building and applying decimal notation and computation.
  • Who found the most money? Students could make graphs showing what each family member found. What should you do when money was found by combined efforts? 
  • Would $34.67 feed your family in a sit-down resturaunt? What might have happened if the adult Pigs had decided to order an appetizer, soup, salad, and a main course and then a dessert? What information did the Pig family need to know to be sure they had enough money? 
  • Tax and tip were included in the prices. Do most resturaunts do that? Why or why not?

Related ORC Resources

Change Maker
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Resource Information
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Ohio Standards

Number, Number Sense and Operations Standard
    Benchmarks (3-4)
    F. Count money and make change using both coins and paper bills.
    Grade Level Indicators (4)
    8. Solve problems involving counting money and making change, using both coins and paper bills.
    10. Use physical models, visual representations, and paper and pencil to add and subtract decimals and commonly used fractions with like denominators.